Local Colour: Souvenir Birdhouses Flock to Southern Homes

If you’ve ever traveled anywhere within a few hundred kilometers of Chattanooga, Tennessee, you’ve been bombarded with enchanting barn roofs and billboards telling you to “See Rock City.” What is Rock City? It is an wonderful appeal on Lookout Mountain where it’s claimed you can view seven countries: Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Alabama. There are stunning rock formations, 140-foot falls, a suspension bridge and the Enchanted Trail. The painted barns are part of the charm of the country landscape and help create a long, boring drive down I-75 much more interesting.

Throughout those seven countries and more, many people have picked up a charming souvenir — the See Rock City birdhouse — and put it somewhere with pride. They’re more prevalent in the South than bottle trees. Here are a few I found across my Atlanta neighborhood this weekend.

This birdhouse was suspended with pride in this lovely urban garden in Atlanta’s Old Fourth Ward.

A few blocks away from the Studioplex (a former cotton warehouse), another birdhouse fits right in at a photographer’s art-filled contemporary attic.

In a bungalow bed-and-breakfast in the Virginia-Highland neighborhood, a See Rock City birdhouse sets the tone for a fun and relaxing stay.

One of my neighbors has this great fence with posts that are topped off with an eclectic assortment of birdhouses. Obviously, a See Rock City one is included!

Following my brother and his family visited Rock City, I told him he would better have brought me a birdhouse. I had never mentioned wanting him earlier, but sure enough, my sister and my sister-in-law know me there it was, all put together for me on my birthday.

I have not found the perfect place for it yet, so I have been moving it around and checking out what my neighbors do with them.

Tell us : What kind of items add regional or local color to your hometown?

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2 Washington Studios Give Artists Somewhere to Produce

Artists need time to think, daydream and let new ideas to create — Henry Thoreau’s greatest work was done in isolation at Walden Pond, and Vincent van Gogh painted many of his masterpieces while still glancing at the lavender fields of Provence. But finding that period can be hard.

Cyndy Hayward purchased a 14-acre plot of land in Oysterville, Washington, with the intent of turning it into an artists-in-residence colony to assist artists find their creative spark. Understanding it’s going to take time and money to complete her eyesight, she has begun slowly, first creating a little structure containing two studios next to her house. Architect Geoffrey Prentiss worked closely with her, creating a stunning, durable and high-functioning location as the beginning of her dream.

Studio at a Glance
Who works here: Artists at the Willapa Bay AiR program
Location: Oysterville, Washington
Size: 280 square feet
Cost: $75,000

Photographer: Michael Datoli

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

The 280-square-foot structure consists of two independent studio spaces with a carport, bicycle storage and a little bathroom in between. The artists remain in nearby cottages at night and work in the studio throughout the day.

Hayward chose durable materials that would fit into her budget and still look great. “Since the building was to house spaces which would be splattered with paint and materials, I knew I needed it to be simple and relatively cheap,” she says. “But style and design were crucial. I like to believe all structures are works of art”

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

The two studios are extremely close to the main property. The main home’s corrugated metal roof fits the roofing and running-seam siding around the studio.

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

When ceramics artist Sandy Bradley completed her residency, Hayward asked her to design these habit hand-painted concrete tiles to the studio sunny patio.

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

Garage doors on both sides of the studio could be opened completely for light and air. The wide opening also allows artists to bring large items in and out.

Prentiss Balance Wickline Architects

Prentiss installed polycarbonate sheet siding (Polygal) within the studio’s vulnerable framing. The translucent walls have been an inexpensive solution to the demand for good all-natural light. Windows would’ve added to the budget substantially; Hayward also knew they would occupy a lot of wall space which would be used for working and displaying art, and that the view may actually be a distraction.

Each studio has its own door which leads out to the terrace, so performers can take gaze and breaks upon the meadow.

The Polygal wall panels also helped to cut back on the cost of drywall and insulation. The studio is not a fulltime residence, therefore this compromise in substances functioned. But it will get cold in the winter, therefore Hayward equipped each studio with electric heaters, in addition to exhaust fans, electricity outlets, sinks with paint traps and art-grade fluorescent light.

More: Strategies for getting the most creative area you crave

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Basement of the Week: Family Friendly and A Man Cave Goes Chic

This formerly dark basement was kind of a guy cave, heavy on the cave. While the husband still wanted it to serve as his lair, he also wanted it to be a family-friendly spot he could enjoy with his wife, 12-year-old daughter, friends and extended family. “My clients wanted a room that was cool, modern and full of light, where they can hang out, watch movies, play games and entertain,” says interior decorator Arlene Lord. The basement also comprised their guest area, which needed to be more inviting for guests and brought up to code for security. Following is a glance at how Lord used light colors, light and reflective surfaces to brighten this up walk-out basement.

Basement at a Glance
Who lives here: A family of 3
Location: Portland, Oregon
Size: Around 1,700 square feet

Before Photo

The basement was a location where the family’s left wing furniture stagnated. “You will find five distinct stripes on the walls, and the space was dark, funky and had an unusual layout,” Lord says.

AFTER: The biggest room in the basement has three windows and a doorway to a terrace outside. Lord made the most of the pure lighting with light paint colors, and supplemented the daylight using a chandelier, recessed lighting and a mixture of table and floor lamps.

Lord made a custom sectional couch and comfortable leather wingback chair for film watching and relaxing. She commissioned photographer Steve Eltinge for its massive piece over the couch; it shows that a flock of birds flying over nearby Cannon Beach.

Sofa fabric: Kravet; side table, floor lamp: Arteriors

A visit to Pratt & Larson to pick out tile for the fireplace surround was rather fortuitous. “We wanted something fluid and organic here; I was pricing tile that turned out to be way too expensive and ran across this gorgeous slab of Calacatta marble,” Lord says. The shop had made a decision to quit carrying rock slabs and’d slashed the costs; Lord picked up this gorgeous slab for a once-in-a lifetime bargain price.

The husband is a techie and played a massive role in designing the wall of press built-ins, alongside the audiovisual pro, the cabinetmaker as well as Lord. Digital components are wired into a vented cabinet under the TV. The four drawers on the left are for bulky toys and games, while the upper drawers shop DVDs and CDs.

Side tables, table lamp: Arteriors; seat: custom made by Lord Designs; carpets: habit; window treatment fabric: Kravet

Lord Design

One piece of leftover furniture that the family has owned for years is that this lovely dining room table, which now serves as a game and puzzle table. The girl has dubbed the custom-designed banquette “The Arlene” after Lord. She likes to sit and watch movies while doing different things.

The Asian art on the walls and the statue are a nod to the 12-year-old’s proficiency in Mandarin, which she’s learned through a college immersion program.

Banquette fabric: Loose Leaf, Candace Olsen for Kravet; chandelier: Kravet; ancestral Asian art: Antiques and Oddities

Before Photo

Walls initially closed off a little room (about 7 by 12 ft) into the right of this staircase. Nobody wanted to invest time in here.

AFTER: Lord knocked down the wall and used the space for a fabulous wet bar. Because this area is nowhere near the pure light, she utilized artificial lighting, metallic reflective flooring tiles, Calacatta marble, white cabinets and a large mirror to maintain the light shifting around.

Painting: Stars Antiques, pub stools: West Elm, bar cart, table lighting: Arteriors; tile: via Pratt & Larson, stopped

She also scored this remnant piece of creamy Calacatta marble for another bargain at Pratt & Larson.

Along with the microwave and sink, you will find built-in refrigerator closets.

Before Photo

The clients have family on the East Coast and desired a guest room for cross-country visitors. In the previous guest room, “a giant, wonky closet [left] hardly left enough room to walk around the bed,” Lord says.

AFTER: Two built-in wardrobes on both sides of the headboard take the place of this closet. Drawers beneath the platform bed provide plenty of storage for linens. Now there’s also enough room to walk around the bed.

As it turned out, the prior guest area was also prohibited as a result of egress issues. Lord added a step concealed as a shelf beneath the window to bring it up to code, then additional floating shelves to help camouflage it.

Without room for nightstands, Lord made the bed to have a shelf behind the top of the headboard for reading lamps, publications and glasses. “I made a heavily tufted headboard to balance out the sleekness of this room,” Lord says.

Throw pillows: West Elm

The clients picked up this series highlighting Portland’s bridges at the Portland Saturday Market.

Before Photo

The husband is in a group, and this is his music room, which was quite dark and disheveled before the redesign. It also serves as an overflow guest room.

AFTER: “I upholstered the mattress to the daybed to give it more of a couch appearance,” Lord says. She also lightened the walls up and additional new window treatments, new carpeting and a brand new desk.

The wooden piece onto the side table is some sort of instrument — anyone want to hazard a guess about what kind or where it is from?

Before Photo

“The bathroom walls had a hideous texture. Smoothing the partitions made the largest impact in here,” Lord says.

Lord Design

AFTER: The metallic tile from the hallway and wet bar room stretch into the restroom, and newly smoothed white walls bounce the light around. The art over the commode also pays homage to Portland’s bridges.

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Overhauled Interiors at a Tiny Fisherman's Cottage

Even though it’s a part of Irish history, this 280-square-foot cabin was rotting away in Ireland’s coastal town of Bray. Constructed in the 1880s as a crude fisherman’s cabin, it was decaying and uninhabited because a poor remodel in the 1960s. The client, who grew up in Bray, pictured bringing the cabin into life as a little vacation home.

Colm Doyle and DMVF Architects helped her turn this very small space into something livable and bright. Behind its traditional cabin exterior, a new, modern interior revolves around an innovative plywood cube that divides the space by action, creating a slick and open feel.

at a Glance
Who lives here: This is another home for a Dublin girl to keep in while visiting with her mother.
Location: Bray, Ireland
Size: 280 square feet

DMVF Architects

The client wanted to maintain the cottage look of the exterior. Owing to its history, this home is listed as a protected structure, which intended Doyle couldn’t knock it down and needed to operate inside its tiny footprint. But since the house was remodeled in the 1960s, the interior could be changed dramatically.

The cabin doesn’t have any front or back garden, and originally had only one tiny toilet that needed to be accessed from the outdoors.

DMVF Architects

Traditional forms fall away indoors, as you can see in those pictures of the redesign, taken before the home has been decorated and furnished.

The first layout had divided the house with a galley kitchen down the middle — right in the entrance — with all the bedroom on one side and a little living area on the opposite. The strange layout made the 280 square feet feel even smaller. The client wanted to make the most of the light and space in the home.

DMVF Architects

Doyle and his staff removed the home’s first low ceiling and added a plywood cube, each side with its own purpose. The kitchen takes one side, access into the shower area is around the corner, a sleeping loft sits on the very top, and also this side holds storage and a little utility area. “It became evident very quickly during the design procedure that every last inch of space needed a specific purpose and dedicated usage,” says Doyle.

Before Photo

BEFORE: Water seeping in through a leaky roof caused damage throughout the home. Unoccupied for the past ten years, the house had no functioning gas or electric system. The kitchen has been terribly outdated — an awkward mix of styles and tastes from various eras.

DMVF Architects

AFTER: The back side of the cube now holds the kitchen and extra storage. The railing above opens into the bedroom near the peak of the cube, which faces back windows and skylights. Nothing exists from the previous kitchen sleek cabinetry, durable countertops and modern appliances now make up a simple space which works perfectly for another home.

DMVF Architects

Because the cabin was left unoccupied and in a terrible state for such a long time, it was difficult for the client to envision the way the interior could eventually become livable. While she wanted it to be comfortable and full of light, she didn’t have any preferences stylewise, so Doyle and his group were basically left with a blank slate.

Before Photo

BEFORE: The initial living area was obsolete and suffering from severe water damage. Wallpaper peeled from the walls, and old linoleum covered the floors.

DMVF Architects

AFTER: though the cube occupies about half the floor area in the house, it allots far more living space than the initial divided layout did. “This endeavor was about working from the minimum upward,” says Doyle. “We looked at the minimum dimensions of each one of the elements or purposes, and allocated space to them then.”

DMVF Architects

Stairs built into the plywood cube lead until the sleeping stage.

The home’s small size produced work challenging for the building group, especially with no outdoor backyard to retreat to. Doyle had to make certain only a couple people were in the home at precisely the exact same time, so construction could be safe and productive.

DMVF Architects

A surprisingly spacious loft takes advantage of the cottage’s sloped ceilings. Large skylights allow in afternoon and evening light but keep the space from getting too bright in the daytime. Closet and storage area built in the wall removes the requirement for a dresser or wardrobe.

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Graphic Vintage Style in an East London Townhouse

From vintage fashion posters put against stark white walls to handpicked furniture, style writer and journalist Hywel Davies’ terrace townhouse carefully accounts functional flow with perfect spaces for entertaining. “I opted for white walls and dark flooring to serve as a blank canvas for my own accessories and furniture,” he says, “which is where I feel that the main design personality is found.”

When Davies bought the house a couple of decades ago, he set to work straight away, ripping out all the carpets, stripping off the floorboards, installing a new kitchen and knocking down walls. Then he included his own decorative touches to produce the light and bright space match his fashion-forward style.

at a Glance
Who lives here: Hywel Davies and his partner
Location: Lower Clapton, Hackney, East London
Size: 160 square meters (1,722 square feet); 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths

Beccy Smart Photography

Davies describes his design design functional and basic, with a mixture of vintage and new. He sources most of his furnishings out of London’s secondhand shops and out of economies in Berlin and Paris.

He highlights subtle symmetries in each of the house’s spaces. This pair of black leather armchairs is from a Royal Air Force base.

Beccy Smart Photography

A well-worn chesterfield leather sofa from John Lewis adds soft lines into this linear space and contrasts with the zigzag floor lamp. Stacked industrial-style stools are at the ready for when Davies entertains.

“The living room is my favorite place in the home to relax, as it is only a staircase from my cellar study,” he states.

Beccy Smart Photography

Black Eames dowel-leg side seats make a statement around a 1960s Danish table. Davies is attracted to the clean lines of Danish design and frequents the Danish Homestore in Nottingham.

Beccy Smart Photography

Stairs lead down in the primary entryway into this ground-floor kitchen. The kitchen and dining room lead straight onto a recently additional garden deck.

Beccy Smart Photography

New skylights keep the kitchen space open and encourage flow in the kitchen into the backyard deck. An upholstered armchair at the head of the table can easily become a reading nook throughout the day.

Beccy Smart Photography

The biggest and most costly part of the remodel was cladding the brand new kitchen in stainless steel. Davies chosen to get a couple of open shelves to minimize clutter.

Beccy Smart Photography

Davies added a backyard deck, where he enjoys dining and where he keeps a small range of potted plants.

Beccy Smart Photography

This is an opinion of the home from the rear of the massive garden. “My notion of gardening is becoming someone else to do it,” Davies says.

Beccy Smart Photography

Upstairs, he included a wall sticker of a world map to accent the blank wall between the 3 bedrooms.

Beccy Smart Photography

A unique industrial-style vest found in a secondhand store also sits in the hallway between the bedrooms

Beccy Smart Photography

Within this guest bedroom, also at the other bedrooms too, Davies splurged on genuine Fog & Mørup pendant lighting.

Beccy Smart Photography

The master bedroom keeps exactly the same minimum, neutral color palette as the rest of home.

Beccy Smart Photography

Davies collects graphic design posters. Hanging here’s a poster commemorating the 50th anniversary of the font Helvetica.

Beccy Smart Photography

Davies repurposed a vintage crate for a TV stand, which conveniently hides the wires behind.

Beccy Smart Photography

He knocked down walls to combine two small bedrooms into a big bathroom. A gray claw-foot tub has a view of the backyard garden. From the corner, built-in shelves hold towels and other essentials.

Beccy Smart Photography

The large walk-in shower includes classic white subway tiles.

Beccy Smart Photography

Davies chose an old-fashioned bathroom throughout the renovation to increase the vintage, traditional feel. Along with the tub, it is a surprising highlight of the space.

Beccy Smart Photography

An additional guest bedroom with Orla Kiely bedding and a classic leather welcomes guests and guests.

Beccy Smart Photography

See more photographs of this Home

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Tiny Amsterdam Apartment Bursts With Character

Although this Amsterdam rental already had sufficient character, interior designer Rosa van den Kerkhof and Dirk van den Wijngaard turned into a cozy home that oozes with personality. A composite of antique bits, new industrial furniture along with cultural treasures mixed in from world travels gives this little, light-filled home a playful and diverse appearance.

in a Glance
Who lives here: Rosa van den Kerkhof and Dirk van den Wijngaard
Location: Amsterdam
Size: 65 square meters (699 square feet); 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom

Holly Marder

Van den Kerkhof dwelt at the apartment upstairs for nearly six years before this one became available. The hardwood flooring and the flat’s charming original features, for example, marble fireplace surround and high ceilings, instantly attracted the couple. “There was also central heating!” she laughs. “If you have ever spent a winter at a high-ceilinged, drafty old apartment in the Netherlands, then you’ll know that is an instantaneous selling point”

Holly Marder

The founder of her own interior design business, Studio Nest, van den Kerkhof loves to mix several design styles. “An interior is an extension of your personality,” she says. “I think it’s boring to stick with just one style.”

This cognac leather armchair was a lucky find on the Dutch secondhand website Marktplaats. Piles of magazines within arm’s reach plus also a large pouf turns the formerly empty space between the living and dining rooms into a comfortable dining room.

Holly Marder

In the living room, the couple paired a contemporary charcoal grey sectional with a classic chair, graphic black and white rug, and an array of textured cushions.

Van den Kerkhof initially studied theater design until she realized it wasn’t the ideal match. The correlation between theater and home design led her into the world of interiors. “If you style theater, you’re translating a story into scenery, so it is quite like designing an interior, except that it is a more tangible and durable kind of design,” she says.

Holly Marder

“I like things that are utilized, that have a story inside them,” van den Kerkhof says. “I feel it enhances the appearance and feel of a room.”

This lotion classic leather chair was her very first classic purchase, and, to this day, it is one of her favorite pieces.

Rug: Ikea

Holly Marder

“Working in the interior design industry has certainly influenced my style,” van den Kerkhof says. During her interior styling studies, she worked in Baden Baden, the former showroom of the iconic Dutch designer Piet Boon, whose style combines modern elements with renewable materials. “I heard a lot about styling out of my colleagues and has been highly influenced by Piet Boon’s symmetrical style. I have since tried to let go of a bit so as to produce my own style.”

The tray table is a gift from her father, who has traveled extensively around the world.

Holly Marder

This collector’s item classic armchair is another bit awarded to van den Kerkhof from her father. When he was young, he painted it without recognizing its own value. It’s one of her favorite bits — here, she has paired it with an inexpensive classic stool she recuperated.

The few latest purchase is that their Foscarini Diesel Fork floor lamp, which adds a bit of functional chic to the room while adhering to contemporary lines.

Shelving unit: Expedit, Ikea

Holly Marder

Van den Kerkhof gave a classic French cabinet a fresh lease on life with charcoal grey paint and some new grips from Zara Home. The item now provides functional storage for the couple’s TV.

The apartment sports a warm color scheme of black, white, gray and neutral tones, with the exception of a couple of well-placed bursts of color. “I adore gray combined with timber for a warm appearance,” she says.

Holly Marder

A low console is home to books, music, artwork, drinks and another one of the few favorite items — a lovely lamp that van den Kerkhof purchased while functioning at Baden Baden.

Above the console, a gallery screen features framed artworks by South African artist Marlene Dumas, a Matisse print, an Etsy artwork print and functions from an assortment of artwork called “Vita Brevis Ars Longa” (translated: “Art Is Long, Life Is Short). Van den Kerkhof painted the dog picture when she was 15.

Holly Marder

Even though the apartment doesn’t offer much in the means of space or storage, the couple love their home for its own authenticity and original detailing.

At the dining area, bright tangerine lamps draw the eye up, toward the high ceilings, and highlight the stunning original sash windows with stained-glass detailing.

Pendants: Arne Jacobsen for Louis Poulsen

Holly Marder

Van den Kerkhof has carved out a very small workspace at the corner of the apartment, which is where she does each of her design work and meets with customers.

The desk chair has been found abandoned on the side of the street near a trash bin. “It was dirty and old, and it has a paint mark on it. Most people would say it is trash, but I really like it!”

Drawer unit: Alex, Ikea

Holly Marder

This cherished sideboard spent nearly all of its life in van den Kerkhof’s parents’ living room. When she went away to study, the cabinet went with her. Having experienced a few facelifts, from white to deep red, its fresh pale grey hue and fresh knobs create the perfect addition to the dining room.

In addition to the classic sideboard,a wooden tray is used as a foundation for a vase, a little book bought during a weekend in Paris, brushes and pencils used during her studies, along with a stone her father gave her when she was young. A candlestick out of Ikea gives the arrangement height.

Holly Marder

Renting can be a limiting design factor, so the couple made the kitchen their own by accessorizing it with pretty and practical items. Wood cutting boards provide a soft accent contrary to the kitchen’s white tiled walls.

A single shelf holds a collection of decorative blue and white china bowls, crisp white kitchen accessories and some of their favorite cookbooks.

Holly Marder

A silver Moroccan sugar cup and pot are a part of a group given to van den Kerkhof by her father. The matching tray table is in the living room. When her father was young, he worked on a ship and traveled a lot, collecting bits and pieces on the way. Van den Kerkhof pairs those treasures with functional utensil storage beside the stove in kitchen.

Holly Marder

Floor to ceiling drapes in a soft latte color accentuate the bedroom’s large ceilings. Crisp white bedding is a soothing background for a contrasting black ring lamp.

Holly Marder

Outdoor space comes with a hefty price tag in this portion of earth, so the set was happy to have this balcony to enjoy warm weather.

Holly Marder

A comfortable sofa in the balcony overlooks the enchanting Dutch style architecture where Amsterdam is famous.

“The place we live in is really beautiful, with lots of cafes and stores, along with also a food market on Saturdays,” van den Kerkhof says.

telephone: Do you live in a creative downtown apartment? Discuss it with us!

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Open Walls Widen Home Possibilities

My dream home has a spacious wall with a door. It opens to a deck and a pool and some kind of sunny, spectacular view, preferably with all the Pacific Ocean in the background.

However, truth be told, I would settle for a garage door which opens on my own work-in-progress backyard.

Open walls would be the greatest embodiment of indoor-outdoor living, blurring the lines (well, eliminating them actually) between the two. They are a fresh-air enthusiast’s fantasy come true, and there is something about them which is merely friendly and positive. They are the greatest invitation.

But beware, the homes pictured below will likely make your own home feel closed and may induce acute home jealousy. Consider yourself warned.

Urrutia Design

I am pretty certain my dream-house fantasy is just a replica of this home. You may ocassionally find a deer or squirrel in your living space, however, the spaciousness and the willingness make it worth the trouble.

Dick Clark + Associates

Where an actual open wall doesn’t make sense, wall-size windows may do the trick. It seems as though you could dive right from these chairs and into the bay, but the fog has been kept outside.

A garage door doesn’t have to be hiding your automobile and boxes of crap. It may just as easily hide your living space. And it is a relatively simple and inexpensive way to produce an open wall.

Jeannette Architects

Gourmet kitchen, outdoor dining area. This glass garage door is clean and modern; it makes sliding glass doors seem positively old fashioned.

Living2Design

These multipane modern cottage windows open on the garden and make this little dining room feel ever so much larger.

Hanson Fine Building

Another wall of glass. The view doesn’t have to be spectacular to get a wall such as this to make sense. The space and light and feeling of openness are sufficient to make the wall keep. And do not you love the way the clear acrylic chairs play off the glass?

Ojanen_Chiou architects LLP

This sliding accordion door which opens floor to ceiling, turning a little kitchen into a bright, expansive area with an outdoor dining area.

Spinnaker Development

A home doesn’t have to be more ubermodern to operate with an open wall. This traditionally decorated home also receives a boost.

AT6 Architecture : Design Build

This bath takes some courage. I mean, someone in one of those homes down there might have a pair of binoculars. Still, why if living rooms and kitchens have all the fun?

Griffin Enright Architects

What’s there to say about a space with two open walls overlooking rolling green hills anyhow, “Sigh.”

Jennifer Weiss Architecture

Virtually all the exterior walls open on the backyard, turning a segmented home into a open, convivial area where the outdoors are as crucial as the indoors.

Ownby Design

Not having an open wall would be bizarre.

Knudson Interiors

A wall doesn’t have to open on a large, expansive space. Only a little tropical extension for this toilet is motive enough.

John Maniscalco Architecture

The urban version of the expansive perspective. No need for art.

Architect, Lorin Hill

Developing a tiny breezeway between the house and the open atmosphere are able to keep a room from getting too hot in the summer. It also offers a nice visual transition between indoors and out.

I don’t think that it opens, but I don’t care. Magnificent.

More:
Opening Acts: Folding, Sliding and Pivoting Doors

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Small-Business Savvy: Establish a Shipping Station

When you’re setting up a creative studio, the initial focus will be in adapting a space so you can practice your art. If you make quilts, you will establish a table with a sewing machine. If you make ceramic bowls, then you’ll require a potter’s wheel. It’s important to market your studio with the ideal materials and supplies, but when your art can also be a business, an equal amount of consideration should go into making sure those quilts and bowls may get packed up and sent out to customers quickly and economically.

Packing and transport are a huge part of running a creative business, but they can be overwhelming for a small operation. So much energy may go into the making of this product which the shipping period can be overlooked. The important thing is setting up a space devoted to transport and nothing else. Spend some time getting organized and stocking up on gear before large orders start rolling in. Here are a few pointers to help any imaginative business achieve success.

Dream House Studios

Have a large, open surface devoted to transport. Designate a separate place as your transport channel. This space should incorporate an open surface for wrap everything up. The dimensions of this surface needed will vary depending on your craft. But generally speaking, the larger the surface the greater. Devote as much space to transport as you can. It may be frustrating to work in a cramped area.

JDS DESIGNS

Consider adding shelves or cubbies underneath the surface for storing boxes. Maintaining boxes arranged can be the biggest problem when it comes to shipping; heaps of boxes may escape control and immediately start to infringe on your creative space. So select a work surface for the transport channel with shelves or cubbies built in underneath. Flatten all of your boxes and keep them organized by dimension. Maintain bubble mailers and envelopes as well.

Hint: Shop most of your boxes apartment however keep a few made up and accessible so you will be all ready to go in case an order must have sent out immediately.

Utilize a pin board or pegboard to hang tools on so they are ready once you need them. Ensure that your shipping channel is stocked with all of the tools and materials you’ll need. You do not need to be scrambling at the last minute for tape or scissors. You need these products to be highly accessible but also out of the way of your workout surface. The best solution is to hang them by a pin board or pegboard that is adjacent to your shipping channel. Quickly pull down the gear that you require, and cleanup afterward is going to be a breeze.

Install paper roll dispensers for wrap paper and bubble wrap. Should you use rolls of paper or bubble wrap, then consider installing a few paper dispensers. You may either attach them to your work surface or put them next to your channel on the wall. Dispensers make it so much easier to manage paper and cut pieces off.

Jeanette Lunde

Hint: in case you don’t have space for dispensers, store your paper rolls upright in a bin next to your transport channel.

Maintain twine and ribbon together in a caddy. Add prosper to your bundles with twine or ribbon and maintain those loose spools arranged by storing them at a hanging organizer or caddy like this one. This caddy has sufficient space for multiple spools so you can add variety to your packaging.

Hint: Hang a pair of scissors from the caddy. This implies you can always find them when you need to produce a cut.

Keep business cards and other promotional materials at your channel. with your goods, you’re probably shipping out business cards and promotional materials (flyers, coupons ) with your packages. These materials need to be performed beforehand and organized at your transport channel. Organize them in a desktop caddy such as this repurposed metal one. Aesthetically this vintage piece adds rustic charm to the surface, however any drawer or cubbie system will speed up the shipping procedure.

Have a whiteboard or calendar handy for creating a shipping program. It’s important for small businesses to establish a shipping program — it is inefficient to run into the post office every second day. Establish a regular and be honest with your customers about when you send out packages. Maintain a whiteboard or calendar near your shipping channel so you can keep track of orders, check off jobs when you finish them and denote transportation times.

Cost Plus World Market

Wood Potting Bench – $119.99

Repurpose a potting bench to a shipping channel. A reclining seat may be the best answer to get a shipping channel. Many have shelves built in that are best for organizing boxes, mailers and paper. Also they’re normally made out of wood, so it’s easy to screw in hooks to hang tools and materials.

Martha O’Hara Interiors

The key to a successful and effective shipping channel is organization. Put time and effort into this stage of your business and make sure that your studio is stocked with the ideal supplies. Plan beforehand, before you start receiving large orders, to guarantee you will be ready when when items do get active.

Want more advice in setting up your creative space? Learn how to craft the perfect studio.

More Small-Business Savvy:
Personalize Your Packaging

Photograph Products Like a Guru

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A Primer on the Language of Design

I was introducing a job to my client a couple of days back. I stood at the head of the conference table, flanked with my renderings, and began to ruminate on the design idea. The job was to be an urban intervention, and as this could be formal understanding of the tenuous balance between the requirements of the community and the needs of the individual. The project would represent, in built form of course, the space between these contradictory forces — the interstitial kingdom, if you will.

As I finished my presentation and opened my eyes I was greeted with a collective blank stare.

Again.

I had the sobering realization that my clients had no clue what I was talking about. Why does this keep happening to me? I mean, we’re talking the same language, aren’t we? I’m being perfectly clear, aren’t I?

Well, obviously, since I did not do anything wrong, I can only assume that everybody else needs to brush up on common architectural terms. I thought we’d done this before (here), but obviously more study is justified. Feel free to review these flash cards one or two times a day, as required.

And please refrain from staring blankly at me meetings. I’ll lose my train of thought.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

Frankly, I could specify “architecture” all day long. And occasionally I do. Then my clients go to the “structure,” and also the “structure” starts to specify them. It’s like the circle of life, just with more angst.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

We know, we know: All great architecture leaks. Please stop reminding us.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

Actually, “interstitial” is just one of my favourite words. This means “the space between.” Tell me that’s not awesome.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

It must be in the unbearable lightness of shining.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

Here’s a fun fact: Whenever an architect designs a building that struggles with its surroundings, we call it “juxtaposition. ” That is a large word, and it will take you a couple of minutes to emotionally process it. We do this mainly to distract you from the fact that our design does not fit with its surroundings. It buys us some time. Then we will point out the “interstitial” space between our building and its surroundings. Eventually, you’ll get bored and proceed. So it’s a truly win-win.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

I believe they should remove that cushion.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

“It’s all part of the process.” This is what I tell my clients when they are unhappy with the very first attempt at the design. “It’s all part of the process.” But this isn’t really correct. I just allow the interns slap a design together. I’m really seeing it for the first-time today too. We’ll continue working on it.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

Have you been considering me? Great.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

This is the style admired by hipsters. I discovered Bon Iver has a fishing shack at Minnesota clad entirely in flannel.

Jody Brown Architecture, pllc

Architects do not wear pleated trousers. Ever.

Keep reading. You will get it eventually.

More by Coffee With an Architect:
Find Your Inner Minimalist
Flash Cards for Architectural Terms
Find Your Architectural Style
Great Architecture Speaks to Us

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Striped Rugs Lay It on the Line

There’s a reason you see a lot of guys wearing striped tops and pin-striped suits: Stripes are a timeless pattern. And they are not only sartorially chic; striped patterns are a great choice for the home as well. They are a particularly nice choice for area rugs and carpets, which may be a major investment.

A striped rug is frequently a sensible choice. A patterned rug is obviously better at concealing stains compared to a solid-hued carpeting. Plus, a striped rug will match with a number of other patterns and will still be in fashion a few years from now. Stripes may also be used to draw attention to or away from elements you wish to highlight or hide in a space.

Stylewise, stripes underfoot can be a bold selection or a subtle one: Broad bands of white and black make a statement, while subtle tone-on-tone stripes blend into the background. Have a look at these 13 rooms to get a dose of striped-rug inspiration. Perhaps you’ll come across this perennially fashionable layout is just right for your house.

Tara Bussema – Neat Organization and Design

A white and black rug is a powerful choice in this nautically inspired room. This striped version is comparable to Madeline Weinrib’s Black Buche carpets and Ikea’s Stockholm Rand rug.

SchappacherWhite Architecture D.P.C.

In this enchanting cabin, Steve Schappacher and Rhea White added some picture appeal to the usual beach-house aesthetic with a black and white palette and ample usage of stripes.

Dwellings

Set against a dark stained hardwood flooring, this blue and cream coloured rug defines the dining area of an open-plan kitchen and dining space. Coupled with aluminum Navy chairs and a rustic farm dining table, the look is country contemporary.

Richard Bubnowski Design LLC

The subtle cream and tan runners lead the eye through the transitional space enclosing the staircase in this house by Richard Bubnowski Design.

Vanillawood

Bright, bold stripes enliven a upper stairwell within this house by Vanillawood. You may easily create a similar look in an unusual space with carpet tiles in Flor.

Garrison Hullinger Interior Design Inc..

All colors of whites and blues match within this living room by Garrison Hullinger Interior Design. The Dash & Albert rug acts as a canvas on which the designer has put many other striped fabrics.

Scot Meacham Wood Design

Striped rugs aren’t only for inside your home. With a weather-resistant outdoor area rug, you may enjoy a pinch of pattern in your patio as well.

Schranghamer Design Group, LLC

An attic space becomes an airy escape when painted white and accented with calming blues. This white and blue rug is a mild, soft covering for the floor.

Studio Marcelo Brito

A striped floor covering is also a energetic choice in this den. The pattern of these stripes echoes the wall therapy, which resembles the exterior siding of a beachfront cottage.

Patrick Sutton Associates

A barely there stripe is a calming choice within this airy bedroom. The subtle layout enhances the space without drawing attention away from showcase beams like the floating vessel and wall-hung oars.

Tobi Fairley Interior Design

Section of Tobi Fairley’s layout for the Richmond Symphony Orchestra League’s designer show house, this unassuming hallway readily becomes a focal point with its own striped rug and red accents.

Palmerston Design Consultants

You may also stripe right up the stairs using a vibrant runner.

Bountiful

Putting a striped rug within this low-ceiling room gives the illusion of more space by drawing the eyes outward, rather than around the narrow eaves overhead.

More:
11 Area Rug Rules and How to Break Them
Guest Picks: Rugs for Every Room
Browse rugs in the Products section

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